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Uganda Pavilion

Uganda Pavilion

THEME: The Philosophy and Development of Urbanization in Uganda

PAVILION: The Pavilion makes a nice juxtaposition with three distinct exhibit areas, one portraying a rural village, one the natural wonder of Lake Victoria and the third an urban setting in Kampala.

Uganda Pavilion

EXHIBIT: The first exhibit shows life in the Ruwenzori Mountains and includes displays on the world-famous endangered mountain gorillas. Visitors will get a glimpse at the magnificent scenery of Uganda here. The second exhibit re-creates a portion of the shoreline of Lake Victoria, complete with red-crowned cranes standing amongst the reeds. Finally in the Kampala Street representation, mosques, churches and colorful murals display the co-existence of various faiths and ethnic groups in Uganda. Window displays illustrate a variety of urban projects either currently underway or in the planning process, including public transportation, waste and water management and environmental protection.

CUISINE: A café will serve traditional Ugandan beverages.

SHOPPING: There is no specific shopping facility listed for the Pavilion.

Note: This Pavilion was located in the Africa Joint Pavilion.

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France Pavilion

France Pavilion

THEME: The Sensual City

PAVILION: The Pavilion is impressive with a large, classical roof garden and a pond, on which the Pavilion appears to be floating. The walls of the square-shaped structure are made from a special concrete and are covered in plants which gives the illusion of a floating palace. Gardens are the centerpiece of the Pavilion, which was constructed using an innovative wire mesh structure which was used to create the latticed concrete effect that surrounds the Pavilion.

France Pavilion

EXHIBIT: The exhibit is geared towards the senses, with special galleries that are tailored to each of the senses; sight, hearing, taste, touch and smell. Visitors will be able to admire French gardens, smell French perfume, taste French cuisine, touch the cool water of pools and fountains and watch clips from classic French cinema to soak up the glamour of France. Several masterpieces from the Musee d’Orsay by such masters as Gaughin, van Gogh, Rodin, Cezanne and Manet will be exhibited at the Expo, the first time many of them have been out of the country. An escalator will take Visitors to the main exhibition floor, where they can choose to take a stroll through the lovely rooftop garden. The first exhibit visitors arrive at will be a video wall that shows the weather of France as well as introduce the people of France to the Expo. The next section will take visitors inside a French kitchen where they can witness the preparation of world-famous French food. From there it is on to the streets of Paris, where visitors will get to know the laid-back lifestyle of France. This leads into the first of our sense galleries – taste. From there on, we will continue along our journey into France, witnessing the serenity of French urban green spaces as well as the grandeur of the iconic monuments of France. We will get a sense of the urban setting of France. Next is the gallery of smell, as the scents that exemplify the French culture will tantalize visitors with an olfactory journey into France. Continuing along the exhibition corridor, scenes from the acclaimed classics of French cinema are projected onto the wall.

France Pavilion

This leads us directly into the Hearing Gallery, where the sounds of France both urban and rural will delight the visitor. The exhibition corridor will then present France’s historic relationship with the ocean, which takes us into the touch gallery where two sculptures – the Accommodating Structure and the Landscape Bridge, are on display for visitors to touch as they please.

France Pavilion

This leads to one of the great draws of the Pavilion – the works of art from the Musee d’Orsay. Following this extraordinary experience, visitors enter the last of the senses – the sight gallery, with a spectacular fantasy film called “The Extraordinary Voyage.” Visitors will then descend via escalator to the ground floor, where they can wander about freely and enjoy the topiary and fountains in the open-air Pavilion courtyard. Visitors will also be able to arrange romantic French weddings at the Pavilion.

France Pavilion

CUISINE: What would a French Pavilion be without a restaurant to show off their famous cuisine? Master chefs Jacques and Laurent Pourcel are only too happy to introduce visitors to the wonders of French cooking in the exciting Pavilion restaurant 6sens.

SHOPPING: The Pavilion will be selling a wealth of perfume, wine, cookware and other uniquely French items, as well as souvenirs from the Pavilion.

Japan Pavilion

Japan Pavilion

THEME: Harmony of the Hearts, Harmony of the Skills

PAVILION: The Pavilion is a semi-circular structure covered by a purple membrane material. Several antennae and caves make the Pavilion “a breathing organism” which will express the harmony between the human heart and technology. The Pavilion has been dubbed “Purple Silkworm Island” by the Chinese people. It uses solar energy collection batteries hidden in the double-layer membrane and the cave will collect rainwater to spray on its exterior surface to keep temperatures cool.

EXHIBIT: Visitors will enter the Pavilion through a queue where pre-show videos will be played. As visitors are admitted into the Pavilion, they will pass down a corridor into the first section of the Pavilion that is concerned with the past, in particular the friendship between Japan and China. A lighted panel illustrates an ancient painting of envoys from Japan to China during the Tang Dynasty, envoys known as kento-shi. The panels roll out obi-like to create a pleasing visual texture. An escalator then brings visitors through a tunnel decorated with pictures of artifacts from that era in Japanese history, showing the influence of Chinese culture on the Japanese. Ancient crafts such as Nishijin weaving are on display. At the top of the escalator is a sakura (tea ceremony room) with a flowering cherry blossom tree shading it, a representation of the delightful seasons of Japan.  That theme is expanded upon as you walk down a ramp past projections of natural scenes and colors of the Japanese seasons. Each of the following galleries represents a different season, showing how the Japanese people live in harmony with each. The next major gallery looks at the urban setting of Japan, showing the trendsetting architecture and fashion that make up the cities of Japan. Now we have entered the second section of the Pavilion, focusing on Modern Japan. The next gallery focuses on water and the technology being used to reclaim this precious resource. From the Membrane Bioreactor, being used to convert sewage into drinking water, to a reverse osmosis membrane which helps desalinate seawater, Japanese technology is on the cutting edge to help soothe a thirsty world. The next exhibition spaces introduce “Zero-Emission Town,” utilizing current technology to create an urban environment of zero carbon emissions by the year 2020. Video displays, physical exhibits and photomurals show us what life would be like in this city. Technologies being introduced include floorboards that can generate electricity by walking on them, windows covered with thin clear solar cells that generate energy, intelligent robots and advanced motor vehicles that emit almost no carbons at all. We then enter the final section of the Pavilion where we look at the future. The next exhibition area shows us the need for connections between people to help make viable positive changes on a global level. Videos, waterscreens and other media help illustrate these concepts. We then enter the pre-show area where we are introduced to the crested ibis. This bird was declared extinct in Japan in the 1970s. The Chinese government began giving some of its stock to Japan in the 1990s and the birds managed to re-establish themselves in Japan. Visitors will then enter the main theater, where the Pavilion will present a modern opera developed by both Chinese and Japanese directors. The opera combines both Chinas Kunqu opera and Japan’s Noh drama to show friendship and exchanges between the two countries, using the crested ibis as a motif. Exiting the theater, images of smiling faces are meant to lighten the mood.

CUISINE: Restaurant Yamazato is located at the exit of the Pavilion. The 94-seat restaurant includes private dining rooms, teppanyaki dining (in which diners are seated in front of an iron plate where a chef cuts and cooks their meals before their eyes). In addition, diners may order tempura, sushi, broiled eel, broiled beef and tsuki-kaisegi among other treats. The Yamazato restaurant grew from its origins in 1962 at the Hotel Okura Tokyo into one of the most acclaimed restaurants in Japan. There are seven Yamazato restaurants throughout Asia, including one in Shanghai. The chefs will come from various Yamazato restaurants around the globe.

SHOPPING: While there is no specific shopping facility listed for the Pavilion, it’s a good bet that there is a souvenir area somewhere near the exit.